PGA Championship 2018

PGA Championship 2018: The fourth and final major on the tour is the PGA Championship 2018, and this year’s edition, along with being the 100th staging, will follow a month after Francesco Molinari produced a stunning final round to claim the 2018 British Open and secure his first-ever major.

Jordan Spieth will enter as one of the favourites but will have to get past a talented line-up that includes Rory McIlroy and Dustin Johnson, as well as Aussie’s Jason Day and Marc Leishman, and you won’t miss a key moment of the tournament when watching live at home or streaming to a mobile or device.
PGA Championship 2018 Preview

The 100th edition of this major will take place at the Bellerive Country Club in Town and Country, Missouri. The course has a par 71 and covers just under 7500m in distance. It consists of four par 3’s, three par 5’s and 11 par 4’s. The longest hole is the par 5 eighth, which is 613 yards in distance, making it tough to score a red figure. There is close to $11 Million in prizemoney up for grabs, with the winner to receive close to $2 Million and bragging rights as the last major winner until early next year. Also note that this will be the last time the PGA Championship will be played in August, with the PGA announcing from 2019 onwards it will go back to May.

While it feels like Francesco Molinari’s final putt just dropped at Carnoustie, it’s already time to get ready for the next major, the 100th PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club. For the last time this year the PGA will be the season’s final major, as it moves to May on the schedule beginning in 2019 at Bethpage Black.

RELATED: The top 13 picks to win the PGA Championship at Bellerive

Justin Thomas, the defending champion, looks to become the first back-to-back winner of the event since Tiger Woods, who won his third PGA at Medinah in 2006 and his fourth at Southern Hills in 2007. Before that, Woods also accomplished the feat in 1999, also at Medinah, and in 2000 at Valhalla, where he famously ran after his birdie putt on the opening playoff hole. If Thomas wins at Bellerive, he’ll join Woods, Gene Sarazen, Walter Hagen, Leo Diegel and Denny Shute as the only players to successfully defend their PGA title. It would also make him the 19th multiple-time winner in the event’s history.

Speaking of Woods, he makes his return to the PGA Championship field for the first time since 2015. It may be the fourth major, but it’s shaping up to be a must-see affair in Missouri.

Williams vs Kerber

Head To Head. Williams vs  Kerber  all matches, with stats on their H2H rivalry. ATP & WTA Angelique Kerber head to head tennis search. Williams vs  Kerber Live

WIMBLEDON queen Williams vs  Kerber sensationally denied her eighth grass … Serena Williams loses in straight sets to Williams vs  Kerber Live final …. World Cup 2018 final: Start time, how to watch, odds vs Cro.

Serena Williams stunned by Angelique Kerber in Wimbledon 2018 final

Once the men’s semi-finals had finally concluded – a mere 26-and-a-half hours after they began – Angelique Kerber reminded everyone at Wimbledon that tennis can be short and sweet as well as long and arduous.

Kerber needed just 65 minutes to upend the narrative of this fortnight and eject the undeniable heroine of SW19 – Serena Williams – in straight sets.

Dramatic tension might have been lacking during her 6-3, 6-3 victory but the shock factor was huge.

Williams choked up with tears as she spoke to Sue Barker at the presentation ceremony. She has talked all fortnight of the responsibility she felt to all the mothers of the world, and her desire to be a role model for them to follow.

Some might have wondered whether she really meant those things, or whether she was simply out for the glory of an eighth Wimbledon title – which would, incidentally, have carried her level with Margaret Court’s all-time record of 24 majors. But after this emotional post-match interview, the argument is surely settled.

“For all the mums out there, I was playing for you today and I tried really hard,” said Williams, her bottom lip wobbling in a manner that will surely convert a new generation of fans. During her most exalted spells at the top of the game, she has sometimes come across as untouchable and intimidating, but this was a very humanising moment. We have seen with other tennis champions how the heartfelt emotions of defeat can bring a new approachability to their public image.

Kerber’s profile has been contrastingly low. Even in her home country of Germany, she is barely recognised in the street, despite having won both hard-court majors in her previous annus mirabilis of 2016. But that, too, might be about to change.

It is often said that the German tennis boom of the late 1980s – when Boris Becker and Steffi Graf were at their peak – provided the finance for the redevelopment of the Wimbledon grounds because of the amazing sums broadcasters such as RTL were prepared to pay for television rights. Yet no German had lifted a title here since Graf’s swansong in 1996.

“My first memories was watching Steffi here,” said Kerber afterwards, while pointing joyfully at the purple badge that confirmed her as a new member of the All England Club. “She was winning all the matches in two sets actually. I just remember that everybody was playing in white on the grass court. I think Wimbledon is something special. I think it’s traditional. To win here is forever. Nobody can take the title away from me now.”

She plays an understated game, too, with a shot put-style serve that barely gets over 100mph, and a frying-pan forehand. But those legs! They used to be known as the second strongest on the tour, behind those of the Amazonian Williams. Yet while Williams continues to work her way back towards optimal physical conditioning, Kerber has become the ultimate roadrunner.

How do you beat Williams? The evidence suggests that it is not the big-hitters who usually get the job done. It is those who run every ball down and force her to play an extra shot or three.

Kim Clijsters, back in the day, had success with this tenacious approach. So did Jelena Jankovic. But Kerber has now beaten Williams twice in major finals – a boast no one except sister Venus Williams has ever been able to make before.

The previous instance came at the 2016 Australian Open final, when Kerber touched out a 6-4, 3-6, 6-4 victory that left a significant psychological imprint. That remains the only time Williams has lost a major final in three sets, and it established a precedent. Both players went into Saturday’s match knowing Kerber would simply refuse to be bullied off the court by Williams’s body language and aura.

Williams has made two comebacks since the complicated birth of her daughter Olympia in September. The first one – which came in Indian Wells and Miami in March – was essentially a toe-in-the-water exercise. The second, which began at Roland Garros seven weeks ago, had previously delivered nine straight wins and one withdrawal, on account of the right pectoral injury she sustained in Paris.

But how often had Williams been tested? At Wimbledon, she had dropped only one previous set and that came against Camila Giorgi, a fast-swinging, short-rally sort of player.

The obdurate Kerber provided a dramatic contrast, and required Williams to cover so much more ground. She was breathing hard from early on and the absence of many cheap points gave her little chance to recover.

Kerber proved herself to be the female Novak Djokovic here as she returned serve with extraordinary accuracy. Before the final, just over half of Williams’s serves had won the point on their own. In this match, 80 per cent came back, and once the baseline rallies began, Kerber was irresistible.

Tennis matches are so often won and lost through mistakes, but Kerber’s unforced error tally on Saturday stood at a miserly five.

Early in the second set, Williams tried to rouse herself. She became more vocal, came to the net more often, and even went for a “tube” – tennis jargon for the bodyline shot straight at your opponent. But Kerber dodged out of the way, just as she dodged trouble all afternoon. The ball flew long in what felt like a metaphor for the match.

During her post-match press conference, Williams was asked about the scheduling decision to delay the women’s final until after the men had finished. Her answer, like her on-court interview, showed great poise.

“I just feel like it was a necessary evil,” Williams replied. “Not knowing how [long] this match would go, I don’t think they could put the men’s semi-final behind the women because they have to come back the next day.

“If the tables were turned, hopefully they would have done the same with the women. But if you look at it that way, it was probably really the only way to schedule it.”

Kerber vs Williams

Head To Head. Kerber vs Williams all matches, with stats on their H2H rivalry. ATP & WTA Angelique Kerber head to head tennis search. Kerber vs Williams Live

WIMBLEDON queen Kerber vs Williams sensationally denied her eighth grass … Serena Williams loses in straight sets to Kerber vs Williams Live final …. World Cup 2018 final: Start time, how to watch, odds vs Cro.

Serena Williams stunned by Angelique Kerber in Wimbledon 2018 final

Once the men’s semi-finals had finally concluded – a mere 26-and-a-half hours after they began – Angelique Kerber reminded everyone at Wimbledon that tennis can be short and sweet as well as long and arduous.

Kerber needed just 65 minutes to upend the narrative of this fortnight and eject the undeniable heroine of SW19 – Serena Williams – in straight sets.

Dramatic tension might have been lacking during her 6-3, 6-3 victory but the shock factor was huge.

Williams choked up with tears as she spoke to Sue Barker at the presentation ceremony. She has talked all fortnight of the responsibility she felt to all the mothers of the world, and her desire to be a role model for them to follow.

Some might have wondered whether she really meant those things, or whether she was simply out for the glory of an eighth Wimbledon title – which would, incidentally, have carried her level with Margaret Court’s all-time record of 24 majors. But after this emotional post-match interview, the argument is surely settled.

“For all the mums out there, I was playing for you today and I tried really hard,” said Williams, her bottom lip wobbling in a manner that will surely convert a new generation of fans. During her most exalted spells at the top of the game, she has sometimes come across as untouchable and intimidating, but this was a very humanising moment. We have seen with other tennis champions how the heartfelt emotions of defeat can bring a new approachability to their public image.

Kerber’s profile has been contrastingly low. Even in her home country of Germany, she is barely recognised in the street, despite having won both hard-court majors in her previous annus mirabilis of 2016. But that, too, might be about to change.

It is often said that the German tennis boom of the late 1980s – when Boris Becker and Steffi Graf were at their peak – provided the finance for the redevelopment of the Wimbledon grounds because of the amazing sums broadcasters such as RTL were prepared to pay for television rights. Yet no German had lifted a title here since Graf’s swansong in 1996.

“My first memories was watching Steffi here,” said Kerber afterwards, while pointing joyfully at the purple badge that confirmed her as a new member of the All England Club. “She was winning all the matches in two sets actually. I just remember that everybody was playing in white on the grass court. I think Wimbledon is something special. I think it’s traditional. To win here is forever. Nobody can take the title away from me now.”

She plays an understated game, too, with a shot put-style serve that barely gets over 100mph, and a frying-pan forehand. But those legs! They used to be known as the second strongest on the tour, behind those of the Amazonian Williams. Yet while Williams continues to work her way back towards optimal physical conditioning, Kerber has become the ultimate roadrunner.

How do you beat Williams? The evidence suggests that it is not the big-hitters who usually get the job done. It is those who run every ball down and force her to play an extra shot or three.

Kim Clijsters, back in the day, had success with this tenacious approach. So did Jelena Jankovic. But Kerber has now beaten Williams twice in major finals – a boast no one except sister Venus Williams has ever been able to make before.

The previous instance came at the 2016 Australian Open final, when Kerber touched out a 6-4, 3-6, 6-4 victory that left a significant psychological imprint. That remains the only time Williams has lost a major final in three sets, and it established a precedent. Both players went into Saturday’s match knowing Kerber would simply refuse to be bullied off the court by Williams’s body language and aura.

Williams has made two comebacks since the complicated birth of her daughter Olympia in September. The first one – which came in Indian Wells and Miami in March – was essentially a toe-in-the-water exercise. The second, which began at Roland Garros seven weeks ago, had previously delivered nine straight wins and one withdrawal, on account of the right pectoral injury she sustained in Paris.

But how often had Williams been tested? At Wimbledon, she had dropped only one previous set and that came against Camila Giorgi, a fast-swinging, short-rally sort of player.

The obdurate Kerber provided a dramatic contrast, and required Williams to cover so much more ground. She was breathing hard from early on and the absence of many cheap points gave her little chance to recover.

Kerber proved herself to be the female Novak Djokovic here as she returned serve with extraordinary accuracy. Before the final, just over half of Williams’s serves had won the point on their own. In this match, 80 per cent came back, and once the baseline rallies began, Kerber was irresistible.

Tennis matches are so often won and lost through mistakes, but Kerber’s unforced error tally on Saturday stood at a miserly five.

Early in the second set, Williams tried to rouse herself. She became more vocal, came to the net more often, and even went for a “tube” – tennis jargon for the bodyline shot straight at your opponent. But Kerber dodged out of the way, just as she dodged trouble all afternoon. The ball flew long in what felt like a metaphor for the match.

During her post-match press conference, Williams was asked about the scheduling decision to delay the women’s final until after the men had finished. Her answer, like her on-court interview, showed great poise.

“I just feel like it was a necessary evil,” Williams replied. “Not knowing how [long] this match would go, I don’t think they could put the men’s semi-final behind the women because they have to come back the next day.

“If the tables were turned, hopefully they would have done the same with the women. But if you look at it that way, it was probably really the only way to schedule it.”

France vs Croatia

France vs Croatia : What you need to know about 2018 World Cup final in Russia We can’t make you fluent in The Beautiful Game, France Vs Croatia but we can school you with enough info for Sunday’s final France vs Croatia Live

FIFA World Cup 2018 Final: France Vs Croatia Schedule, Start Time, TV, Live Stream, Odds, Prediction

After a full month of excitement, the 2018 FIFA World Cup comes down to one final match. With the Jules Rimet trophy on the line, this thrilling winner-take-all contest between France and Croatia is one that fans will not want to miss. France, a fixture in the latter portions of the knockout stage, are making their third appearance in a World Cup final in the last 20 years, while Croatia has defied the odds to earn a spot in the tournament’s finale for the first time in the history of the country. The conclusion of this World Cup has all the makings for a great battle, even if it appears to be a lopsided on paper.

Oddsmakers opened betting with France as an overwhelming favorite, installing the nation as -115 chalk to win in regulation, which means bettors would have to risk $1.15 to return $1. Les Bleus are also favored against the spread, laying -0.5 goals at the same -115 price. The Blazers are a massive underdog, currently going off at +385—netting $3.85 for every $1 wagered—to pull the upset in regulation. Croatia’s odds improve quite a bit after accounting for the +0.5 goal line, which shifts the country all the way up to -105, but still a bit worse off in comparison to the French line. A draw is thought to be more likely than an outright upset today, with the tie garnering +220 odds. The books do not expect a lot of scoring in this match, with the total goals set at a meager two. Even more indicative of scores being at a premium is that the under side of that bet is currently favored at -130, compared to the over at +105.

Can Croatia, who has won all three of their knockout stage matches in extra time or penalties, pull out one final miraculous victory, or will France put their superior skills on display to claim their second ever World Cup title on Sunday? Jon Price of SportsInformationTraders.com provided his take on the outcome and you might be surprised by how the pro handicapper sees the final playing out. Before getting to his expert prediction, take a peek at the complete schedule, kickoff start time, TV channel, live stream coverage and updated odds for France vs. Croatia. You can also check out the latest World Cup bracket, quotes from star players and managers and more related to the 2018 FIFA World Cup final.

French boss Didier Deschamps, captain of the 1998 World Cup champions and manager of the Euro 2016 finalists, says he is still hurt by falling short against Portugal two years ago (via Reuters):

B/R Football tweeted a quote from Neymar in which the Brazilian talisman claims he won’t be rooting for any particular country on Sunday due to having personal connections to both teams:

Djokovic vs Anderson

Djokovic vs Anderson Live: Novak Djokovic is looking for the fourth Wimbledon title and the 13th Grand Slam trophy, as he will meet with Kevin Anderson in the last final among men (Australian Standard Time).
This is the first final of Djokovic at the All England club with Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal or Andy Murray.

Despite the fact that Anderson took 8th place and is expected to enter the top five next week, Djokovic took the 21st place, which will make him the Wimbledon champion with the lowest score since Golan Ivanisevic in 2001.

For Anderson this is his second Grand Slam final tournament, he took second place Nadal in last year’s US Open. Both of these people can be freed from fatigue: they participated in the two longest semifinals in history, and the history of the game dates back to 1877.

In a live blog below follow Novak Djokovic and Kevin Ander from 11:00 pm EST

Becker: Novak ready to win Baker: Novak is ready to win 2:38
32-year-old Anderson and 31-year-old Djokovic became the first men over 30 who met in the finals of professional tennis in Poltava.

They played against each other six times, Djokovic won in the last five games, two of which won at the Wimbledon Open Championship, and Anderson achieved a separate one ten years ago. victory.

“I hope we can play first,” Djokovic said with a tired smile when asked about the final with Anderson. Of course, Joker jokes, he and Anderson will be there. The question is, who will leave more? Anderson will beat John Isner in 6 hours 36 minutes, and Djokovic will beat Rafael Nadal in 5 hours without a day off. It seems that 24 hours ago Anderson climbed up, and it looks more likely.

But is it possible? 32-year-old Anderson faces two of the most impressive victories in his ten-year career. In the quarter-finals, he first defeated Roger Federer, defeating Roger Federer at 13-11 in the fifth game, and two days later he won the second longest game in Wimbledon history, fifth in the game 26 wins and 24 losses, defeating Isner, this is the player who he did not play for five years. But defeating Djokovic may require a Wimbledon finalist Anderson to improve his game. He’s head to head for 1-5 years, his only victory in Miami 10 years ago. Djokovic is also better returned than Federer or Isner, which makes life even more difficult in South Africa, and they are especially dependent on his ministry on the grass.

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Novak Djokovic defeated Kevin Anderson in the team of 2015, when they met at Wimbledon. (Getty Images)

“I hope we can play first,” Djokovic said with a tired smile when asked about the final with Anderson. Of course, Joker jokes, he and Anderson will be there. The question is, who will leave more? Anderson will beat John Isner in 6 hours 36 minutes, and Djokovic will beat Rafael Nadal in 5 hours without a day off. It seems that 24 hours ago Anderson climbed up, and it looks more likely.

But is it possible? 32-year-old Anderson faces two of the most impressive victories in his ten-year career. In the quarter-finals, he first defeated Roger Federer, defeating Roger Federer at 13-11 in the fifth game, and two days later he won the second longest game in Wimbledon history, fifth in the game 26 wins and 24 losses, defeating Isner, this is the player who he did not play for five years. But defeating Djokovic may require a Wimbledon finalist Anderson to improve his game. He’s head to head for 1-5 years, his only victory in Miami 10 years ago. Djokovic is also better returned than Federer or Isner, which makes life even more difficult in South Africa, and they are especially dependent on his ministry on the grass.

In Anderson’s victory over Isner’s game in the Wimbledon semifinals:

In the semifinals of Wimbledon Djokovic defeated Nadal’s points:

However, for Greater Kev all has not disappeared. Anderson and Djokovic played in Wimbledon two games. Djokovic won one of the regular and simple ways, but in the second game of 2015 Anderson brought two sets of love, then Djokovic scored 7-5 in the fifth inning. Turned the situation over. However, this was the fourth round, and Djokovic did not focus on most of the first two games, it’s hard to imagine that he started the finals this way.

It’s even easier to imagine that Djokovic beat a few disappointing things in the fifth set after defeating Nadal one-on-one – this is already felt for Djokovic. As a final, or at least an important achievement. Since 2016 they have entered the Grand Slam semi-final. So Cinderella can live to form a 6’8 “Anderson, in the last four days he looks like fate. But I will oppose fate and make an obvious choice.

Anderson vs Djokovic

Anderson vs Djokovic Live: Novak Djokovic is looking for the fourth Wimbledon title and the 13th Grand Slam trophy, as he will meet with Kevin Anderson in the last final among men (Australian Standard Time).
This is the first final of Djokovic at the All England club with Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal or Andy Murray.

Despite the fact that Anderson took 8th place and is expected to enter the top five next week, Djokovic took the 21st place, which will make him the Wimbledon champion with the lowest score since Golan Ivanisevic in 2001.

For Anderson this is his second Grand Slam final tournament, he took second place Nadal in last year’s US Open. Both of these people can be freed from fatigue: they participated in the two longest semifinals in history, and the history of the game dates back to 1877.

In a live blog below follow Novak Djokovic and Kevin Ander from 11:00 pm EST

Becker: Novak ready to win Baker: Novak is ready to win 2:38
32-year-old Anderson and 31-year-old Djokovic became the first men over 30 who met in the finals of professional tennis in Poltava.

They played against each other six times, Djokovic won in the last five games, two of which won at the Wimbledon Open Championship, and Anderson achieved a separate one ten years ago. victory.

“I hope we can play first,” Djokovic said with a tired smile when asked about the final with Anderson. Of course, Joker jokes, he and Anderson will be there. The question is, who will leave more? Anderson will beat John Isner in 6 hours 36 minutes, and Djokovic will beat Rafael Nadal in 5 hours without a day off. It seems that 24 hours ago Anderson climbed up, and it looks more likely.

But is it possible? 32-year-old Anderson faces two of the most impressive victories in his ten-year career. In the quarter-finals, he first defeated Roger Federer, defeating Roger Federer at 13-11 in the fifth game, and two days later he won the second longest game in Wimbledon history, fifth in the game 26 wins and 24 losses, defeating Isner, this is the player who he did not play for five years. But defeating Djokovic may require a Wimbledon finalist Anderson to improve his game. He’s head to head for 1-5 years, his only victory in Miami 10 years ago. Djokovic is also better returned than Federer or Isner, which makes life even more difficult in South Africa, and they are especially dependent on his ministry on the grass.

Share on Facebook to share it with Twitter
Novak Djokovic defeated Kevin Anderson in the team of 2015, when they met at Wimbledon. (Getty Images)

“I hope we can play first,” Djokovic said with a tired smile when asked about the final with Anderson. Of course, Joker jokes, he and Anderson will be there. The question is, who will leave more? Anderson will beat John Isner in 6 hours 36 minutes, and Djokovic will beat Rafael Nadal in 5 hours without a day off. It seems that 24 hours ago Anderson climbed up, and it looks more likely.

But is it possible? 32-year-old Anderson faces two of the most impressive victories in his ten-year career. In the quarter-finals, he first defeated Roger Federer, defeating Roger Federer at 13-11 in the fifth game, and two days later he won the second longest game in Wimbledon history, fifth in the game 26 wins and 24 losses, defeating Isner, this is the player who he did not play for five years. But defeating Djokovic may require a Wimbledon finalist Anderson to improve his game. He’s head to head for 1-5 years, his only victory in Miami 10 years ago. Djokovic is also better returned than Federer or Isner, which makes life even more difficult in South Africa, and they are especially dependent on his ministry on the grass.

In Anderson’s victory over Isner’s game in the Wimbledon semifinals:

In the semifinals of Wimbledon Djokovic defeated Nadal’s points:

However, for Greater Kev all has not disappeared. Anderson and Djokovic played in Wimbledon two games. Djokovic won one of the regular and simple ways, but in the second game of 2015 Anderson brought two sets of love, then Djokovic scored 7-5 in the fifth inning. Turned the situation over. However, this was the fourth round, and Djokovic did not focus on most of the first two games, it’s hard to imagine that he started the finals this way.

It’s even easier to imagine that Djokovic beat a few disappointing things in the fifth set after defeating Nadal one-on-one – this is already felt for Djokovic. As a final, or at least an important achievement. Since 2016 they have entered the Grand Slam semi-final. So Cinderella can live to form a 6’8 “Anderson, in the last four days he looks like fate. But I will oppose fate and make an obvious choice.

FIFA World Cup Final

FIFA World Cup Final – France Vs Croatia Schedule, Start Time, TV, Live Stream, Odds, Prediction FIFA World Cup Final Live After a full month of excitement, the  FIFA World Cup Final comes down to one final match.

After a full month of excitement, the 2018 FIFA World Cup comes down to one final match. With the Jules Rimet trophy on the line, this thrilling winner-take-all contest between France and Croatia is one that fans will not want to miss. France, a fixture in the latter portions of the knockout stage, are making their third appearance in a World Cup final in the last 20 years, while Croatia has defied the odds to earn a spot in the tournament’s finale for the first time in the history of the country. The conclusion of this World Cup has all the makings for a great battle, even if it appears to be a lopsided on paper.

Oddsmakers opened betting with France as an overwhelming favorite, installing the nation as -115 chalk to win in regulation, which means bettors would have to risk $1.15 to return $1. Les Bleus are also favored against the spread, laying -0.5 goals at the same -115 price. The Blazers are a massive underdog, currently going off at +385—netting $3.85 for every $1 wagered—to pull the upset in regulation. Croatia’s odds improve quite a bit after accounting for the +0.5 goal line, which shifts the country all the way up to -105, but still a bit worse off in comparison to the French line. A draw is thought to be more likely than an outright upset today, with the tie garnering +220 odds. The books do not expect a lot of scoring in this match, with the total goals set at a meager two. Even more indicative of scores being at a premium is that the under side of that bet is currently favored at -130, compared to the over at +105.

Can Croatia, who has won all three of their knockout stage matches in extra time or penalties, pull out one final miraculous victory, or will France put their superior skills on display to claim their second ever World Cup title on Sunday? Jon Price of SportsInformationTraders.com provided his take on the outcome and you might be surprised by how the pro handicapper sees the final playing out. Before getting to his expert prediction, take a peek at the complete schedule, kickoff start time, TV channel, live stream coverage and updated odds for France vs. Croatia. You can also check out the latest World Cup bracket, quotes from star players and managers and more related to the 2018 FIFA World Cup final.

French boss Didier Deschamps, captain of the 1998 World Cup champions and manager of the Euro 2016 finalists, says he is still hurt by falling short against Portugal two years ago (via Reuters):

B/R Football tweeted a quote from Neymar in which the Brazilian talisman claims he won’t be rooting for any particular country on Sunday due to having personal connections to both teams:

Wimbledon Final

Wimbledon Final said with a weary smile when he was asked about his final with wimbledon The Djoker was joking, of course; he and Wimbledon Final 2018 will be there. The question is, who will have more left? Wimbledon Final Live is coming off a …

Wimbledon 2018: Novak Djokovic aims to turn despair into triumph with 13th Grand Slam title

On Sunday, Novak Djokovic will aim to turn despair into triumph as he eyes his fourth Wimbledon title against South African ace Kevin Anderson in the Grand Slam final. Djokovic last won a Grand Slam in 2016 when he claimed the French Open title.

London: Novak Djokovic is the overwhelming favourite to secure a fourth Wimbledon title on Sunday but he admits he feared his best days were behind him when his career nose-dived over the last year. The 31-year-old former world number one won the last of his 12 majors at the 2016 French Open when he completed the career Grand Slam. And after a shattering quarter-final exit at this year’s Roland Garros, which saw his world ranking slump to its lowest in 12 years, the Serb even considered sitting out Wimbledon where he has been champion in 2011, 2014 and 2015.

However, on Saturday, Djokovic was the big-hitting, chest-pumping star of old as he defeated old rival Rafael Nadal 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (11/9), 3-6, 10-8 in an epic semi-final to book a Sunday title showdown with Kevin Anderson. “Yes, there were moments of doubt, of frustration, disappointment, where you’re questioning whether you want to keep it going,” said Djokovic back in a Slam final for the first time since finishing runner-up at the 2016 US Open. It was at Wimbledon last year where his troubles started.

An elbow injury forced a retirement in his quarter-final and he sat out the rest of 2017. He was then knocked out of the Australian Open in the last 16 in January by Hyeon Chung, then ranked at 58. Taro Daniel, the 109-ranked Japanese player, stunned in him in Indian Wells before Benoit Paire, at 47 in the rankings, knocked him out in Miami.

In what was becoming a familiar tale, Martin Klizan, at 140, ousted him in Barcelona before there were signs of life with a run to the final at Queen’s Club on the eve of Wimbledon. “I managed to overcome challenges and obstacles, get myself to the final of a Slam,” added Djokovic, whose 5-hour 15-minute win over Nadal was the fifth longest singles match ever played at Wimbledon. “Obviously if you told me that six months ago, I would take it right away.

“But did I truly believe that I can get back on the level? Yes, I mean, it’s hard for me to play tennis and not believe that I can be the best in what I do.” At Wimbledon this year, he has battled unruly crowds, claiming elements of Centre Court were “unfair” to him in his win over home hope Kyle Edmund, and bizarre scheduling. Seeded at a lowly 12, he suffered the indignity of being exiled to Court Two for his second round.

He will take a 5-1 career record over 32-year-old Anderson into Sunday’s final. His only loss was in 2008, while he has twice defeated the big-serving South African in two of his trophy-winning campaigns at Wimbledon in 2011 and 2015. Victory on Sunday will make the 21st-ranked Djokovic the lowest-ranked champion since Goran Ivanisevic in 2001. Anderson, 32, is the first South African man since Brian Norton in 1921 to reach the Wimbledon final.

He is also just the third African to reach this stage after Norton and Jaroslav Drobny who represented Egypt when he made the championship match in 1952 and 1954. “I really hope that it’s a source of inspiration for kids,” said Anderson after his 6-hour 36-minute epic semi-final win over John Isner, the second longest singles match ever played at a Grand Slam.

The 2017 US Open runner-up had knocked out eight-time champion Roger Federer in the quarter-finals, also in five sets, saving a match point along the way. The Florida-based Johannesburg-born player has spent 21 hours on court getting to the final. Sunday’s final may not be easy on the eye, however, with Anderson having fired 172 aces so far while boasting the fourth fastest serve at 140mph (225.3 km/h).

“I don’t know if I’ll be the clear favourite in that one. I think we’re quite even,” insisted Djokovic as he looked ahead to the first Wimbledon final of modern times to feature two men over 30. “He’s definitely playing the tennis of his life. He’s coming off from two epic marathon five-set wins. I don’t think he has much to lose. “He’s going to come out with big serves and big tennis. Hopefully I’ll be able to weather the storm.

Wimbledon

Wimbledon 2018 said with a weary smile when he was asked about his final with Wimbledon  The Djoker was joking, of course; he and Wimbledon 2018will be there. The question is, who will have more left? Wimbledon 2018 Live is coming off a …

Wimbledon 2018: Novak Djokovic aims to turn despair into triumph with 13th Grand Slam title

On Sunday, Novak Djokovic will aim to turn despair into triumph as he eyes his fourth Wimbledon title against South African ace Kevin Anderson in the Grand Slam final. Djokovic last won a Grand Slam in 2016 when he claimed the French Open title.

London: Novak Djokovic is the overwhelming favourite to secure a fourth Wimbledon title on Sunday but he admits he feared his best days were behind him when his career nose-dived over the last year. The 31-year-old former world number one won the last of his 12 majors at the 2016 French Open when he completed the career Grand Slam. And after a shattering quarter-final exit at this year’s Roland Garros, which saw his world ranking slump to its lowest in 12 years, the Serb even considered sitting out Wimbledon where he has been champion in 2011, 2014 and 2015.

However, on Saturday, Djokovic was the big-hitting, chest-pumping star of old as he defeated old rival Rafael Nadal 6-4, 3-6, 7-6 (11/9), 3-6, 10-8 in an epic semi-final to book a Sunday title showdown with Kevin Anderson. “Yes, there were moments of doubt, of frustration, disappointment, where you’re questioning whether you want to keep it going,” said Djokovic back in a Slam final for the first time since finishing runner-up at the 2016 US Open. It was at Wimbledon last year where his troubles started.

An elbow injury forced a retirement in his quarter-final and he sat out the rest of 2017. He was then knocked out of the Australian Open in the last 16 in January by Hyeon Chung, then ranked at 58. Taro Daniel, the 109-ranked Japanese player, stunned in him in Indian Wells before Benoit Paire, at 47 in the rankings, knocked him out in Miami.

In what was becoming a familiar tale, Martin Klizan, at 140, ousted him in Barcelona before there were signs of life with a run to the final at Queen’s Club on the eve of Wimbledon. “I managed to overcome challenges and obstacles, get myself to the final of a Slam,” added Djokovic, whose 5-hour 15-minute win over Nadal was the fifth longest singles match ever played at Wimbledon. “Obviously if you told me that six months ago, I would take it right away.

“But did I truly believe that I can get back on the level? Yes, I mean, it’s hard for me to play tennis and not believe that I can be the best in what I do.” At Wimbledon this year, he has battled unruly crowds, claiming elements of Centre Court were “unfair” to him in his win over home hope Kyle Edmund, and bizarre scheduling. Seeded at a lowly 12, he suffered the indignity of being exiled to Court Two for his second round.

He will take a 5-1 career record over 32-year-old Anderson into Sunday’s final. His only loss was in 2008, while he has twice defeated the big-serving South African in two of his trophy-winning campaigns at Wimbledon in 2011 and 2015. Victory on Sunday will make the 21st-ranked Djokovic the lowest-ranked champion since Goran Ivanisevic in 2001. Anderson, 32, is the first South African man since Brian Norton in 1921 to reach the Wimbledon final.

He is also just the third African to reach this stage after Norton and Jaroslav Drobny who represented Egypt when he made the championship match in 1952 and 1954. “I really hope that it’s a source of inspiration for kids,” said Anderson after his 6-hour 36-minute epic semi-final win over John Isner, the second longest singles match ever played at a Grand Slam.

The 2017 US Open runner-up had knocked out eight-time champion Roger Federer in the quarter-finals, also in five sets, saving a match point along the way. The Florida-based Johannesburg-born player has spent 21 hours on court getting to the final. Sunday’s final may not be easy on the eye, however, with Anderson having fired 172 aces so far while boasting the fourth fastest serve at 140mph (225.3 km/h).

“I don’t know if I’ll be the clear favourite in that one. I think we’re quite even,” insisted Djokovic as he looked ahead to the first Wimbledon final of modern times to feature two men over 30. “He’s definitely playing the tennis of his life. He’s coming off from two epic marathon five-set wins. I don’t think he has much to lose. “He’s going to come out with big serves and big tennis. Hopefully I’ll be able to weather the storm.